Lawra

INTRODUCTION

  1. PHYSICAL AND NATURAL ENVIRONMENT.

The principal natural resources in the district are the Black Volta, Brutu Forest Reserves and Mushroom rocks at Babile.

1.1 LOCATION AND SIZE.

The District is one of the eight Districts that make up the Upper West Region. It lies in the north western corner of the Upper West Region in Ghana between Long. 2°25 W and 2°45W and Lat. 10°20 and 11°00. It is bounded to East and south by the Jirapa and Lambussie District and to the North and West by the Republic of Burkina Faso. The total area of the District is put at 1051.2 square km. This constitutes about 5.7% of the Region’s total land area, which is estimated at 18,476 square km (figure 1 shows the District in the Regional context). The size of the District is 1,051.2 Sq.km. The longest distance across the district (length) is 65 km. There are three (3) major towns and 138 villages

POPULATION SIZE AND DENSITY.

The 2000 National Population and Housing census results put the District’s population at 87,525. This is about 15.2% of the Region’s total population of 576,583. This comprises 40,804 males and 46,723 females representing 47% and 53% respectively and the sex ratio is 87.3 males to 100 females (Source: GSS, March 2002). There is intense pressure on natural resources particularly land for agricultural production as well as socio-economic facilities.

The growth rate of the District is 1.7 %. This is however below the national growth rate of 2.7%. The current estimated population of the district as at December 2009 stands at 101, 600. This comprises 53,616 women and 47,546 men. (Source: DPCU 2009).

1.2 TOPOGRAPHY AND DRAINAGE

The landscape of the district is generally flat and low-lying. The land rises to between 180 and 30 metres above sea level with isolated round hills (inselbergs) dotting the landscape. This is a feature associated with the Lawra – Tumu high Plains. The area is underlaid by Birimian rocks high in minerals deposits. There are also strips of alluvial soils along the flood plains of the Black Volta as well as sandy loamy soils along some of its tributaries. The Black Volta the main river in the district drains the district, with Kambaa, Dangbal, Nawer and Kokoligu – Baa rivers, as its tributaries.

1.3 GEOLOGY

The rock formation in the District is essentially brimian with dotted outcrops of granite. The district mineral potential is largely unexplored. Some reconnaissance work indicates the presence of minor occurrences of manganese, Traces of gold and diamond, Iron ore and clay.

As a result of a well- developed fracture pattern in the rocks, the potential for obtaining ground water in the district is very high.

Borehole drilling activities in the early 1980s confirmed the presence of the granite and birimian rocks in the district.

SOILS

The soils in the district consist mostly of laterite soils. These are developed from the birimian and granite rocks which underlie the area. There are also strips of alluvial soils along the flood plains of the Black Volta as well as sandy loams along some of its tributaries.The general nature of the soils, coupled with the traditional land use practices and type of rainfall, tend to have adverse effect on crop production. This forced the youth to look for sustenance elsewhere at the expense of their lives or health.

1.4 CLIMATE

The District experiences two (2) seasons, which are dry and wet season. The dry season starts from October– April and wet season starts from May – September.

*Climate (Annual average temperature distribution): – 35° C for maximum and 21° C for Minimum.

1.5 VEGETATION

The vegetation is guinea savanna grassland with medium size trees. These consist mainly of drought and fire resistant trees such as baobab, dawadawa, shea-tree and acacia. The vegetation is suitable for livestock production (cattle, sheep, goats, pigs and poultry), and this contributes significantly to households incomes in the district. Activities such as bush burning, tree felling for fuel-wood, inappropriate farming practices, overgrazing by livestock, sand and gravel winning among others, tend to have adverse effects on the vegetation.

  • Land Use (Specific to Agriculture)
Land Use

Total land Area (T.L.A)

Agric land Area (T.L.A)

Area under cultivation (2004)

Total area irrigation (2004)

Area under inland waters

Other (forest reserves savannah woodland, etc.)

Hectares %
105,120

27,955

11

5

315.6

3

0.01

0.005

0.33

SOURCE: LAWRA – DADU

Land Use (General)

Land Use Area (*000sq.km) % of Total
Savannah woodland

Bush fallow and other uses

Unimproved pasture

Forest Reserves

Tree Crops

Annual Crops

Wildlife Reserves

Unreserved Forest

0.8

98.35

3.156

2.0

275.3

23.5

0.08

9.36

0.33

0.2

26.2

2.23

Total:

SOURCE: LAWRA – DADU

1.6 ENVIRONMENTAL SITUATION

. The Lawra District has a total of 3,152.2 hectares of forest reserves, however, the natural environment of the district has witnessed all kinds of degradation over the years to the extent that the vegetative cover has dwindled and soils have become poor. Widespread bushfires are annual rituals in almost all the communities. However some few communities in the district such as Goziri are adopting to non burning cultures. Indiscriminate felling of trees for fuel wood (the major source of energy), inappropriate farming practices, soil erosion, over grazing of livestock, sand, gravel and stone winning are other acts of environmental degradation in the district.

1.7 WATER SUPPLY

The District can boast of the Black Volta River as a source of water, 24 hour pipe bone water in the 3 major towns and number of boreholes in some communities.

IRRIGATION INFRASTRUCTURE

Lawra district assembly places a high priority on irrigation facilities to enhance dry season gardening. Under CBRDP programme the district constructed a dam at Kokoligu. Another Dam was constructed at Eremon under the UWADEP. However, the combined potential irrigated area for these two dams is less than 15 hectares. This shows that irrigation is highly underdeveloped in the district, despite its critical role in the farming activities and poverty reduction strategies of the people. There is the need to expand the irrigatable area through appropriate technologies like creating small water retention reservoirs during road construction as well as construction of dug-outs and check dams along water ways. Such small dams will not only support dry season gardening on small scale bases but also provide water for animals located in the various communities across the district.

The table below shows the number of dams and dugout in the district:

Dams and Dugouts in the Lawra District
S/NO STATUS NAME OF LOCATION GPS SURFACE CONDIT- USE OF SIZE OF AREA HECTAR- APPROX. SOURCE
(Dam or DAM/ (Community LOCATION AREA ION OF FACILITY IRRIGAB- ACTUA- AGES OF NO. OF OF
dugout) DUGOUT (m) FACILITY (Irrigation, LE AREA LLY CROPS LIVESTO- FUNDING
livestock (Ha) IRRIGA- CULTIVA- CK TYPES FOR
watering, TED TED WATERED FACILITY
domestic use (Ha)
etc)
1 Dugout Dugout Zagkpee N10.57684º 7115.7 Needs L.S.watering
W002.86860º desilting domestic NIL NIL NIL 5 Community
use
2 Dam Dam Babile N10.54901º In good L.S.watering Pepper 1.0
w002.85382º 86403 condition domestic 16.69 3 Ha tomato 1.0
use onion 0.5 6 WADEP
Irrigation okro 0.5
3 Dugout Dugout Susu N10. 56926º Reservior L.S.watering
w002.84976º 25590 needs domestic 1.78 NIL NIL 6 MoFA
clearing use
Irrigation
4 Dugout Dugout Brifoh- N10.50367º Needs L.S.watering Vegetables
Mangbul W002.86201º 2878.4 desilting domestic 1 ha 0.4 pepper o.4 6 Community
use
Irrigation
5 Dam Dam Koroh N10.56392º 39889 In good L.S.watering
W002.83605º condition domestic 7.45 NIL NIL 6 MoFA
use
Irrigation
6 Dugout Dugout Kokoligu N10.98566º In good L.S.watering plantain 0.2
w002.79026º 424318 condition domestic 16.90 3.2 tomato 1.0 6 MoFA
use peper 1.0
Irrigation okro 1.0
7 Dugout Dugout Brutu N10.883385º In good L.S.watering tomato 0.2
W002.74702º 16617 condition domestic 1.0 0.29 pepper 0.09 6 Community
use
Irrigation
8 Dam Dam Ko Nº10.79480 In good L.S.watering Tomato 0.2
W002.70570º condition domestic 4.90 0.8 okro 0.2 6 MoFA
use pepper 0.2
Irrigation
9 Dam Dam guo N10.77475º In good L.S.watering
W002.71052º 120297 condition domestic 5.0 NIL NIL 6 MoFA
use
Irrigation
10 Dugout Dugout Tuopari N10.76168º Needs L.S.watering
W002.69800º 25179 desilting domestic 1.0 NIL NIL 6 Community
use
11 Dugout Dugout Doweni N10.63687º Not in any NIL NIL NIL NIL Community
W002.75477º 977.4 Bad use
12 Dugout Dugout Boo N10.65795º Needs L.S.watering NIL NIL NIL 6 Colonial
W002.70570º 563.1 expansion domestic Government
use
13 Dugout Dugout Eremon N10.65338º Not in any NIL NIL NIL 6 Community
Soriguo W002.78932º 1693.2 Bad use
14 Dam Dam Eremon N10.64629º Good L.S. waterig
Naburinye W002.79711º 111047 condition irrigation and 5.15 NIL NIL 6 MoFA
domestic use
15 Dugout Dugout Eremon N10.66587º Needs L.S.watering
Kakaltuo W002.78000º 2182.6 desilting domestic NIL NIL NIL 5 Community
(dried up) use
16 Dugout Dugout Eremon N10.69066º Wall repairs L.S. waterig 0.42 0.42 Onin 0.22
Buree W002.80417º 967.0 and desilting irrigation and Okro 0.20 5 Community
domestic use
17 Dugout Dugout Eremon N10.66919º Needs L.S. waterig
Lugriyiri W002.79813º 910.4 desilting and NIL NIL NIL 5 Community
domestic use

TARGETED CROP AREAS OF MAJOR CROPS (2008)

CROP CROPPED AREA

(HA)

PRODUCTION

(MT)

ESTIMATED YIELDS

PER HACTOR

1. Maize 3,149 1,968 0.63
2. Millet 12,413 7,448 0.60
3. Sorghum 52,221 46,999 0.90
4. Groundnut 13,403 17,424 1.30
5. Cowpea 2,966 2,669 0.90
6. Soybean 165 147 0.89
7. Rice

Source: MoFA – UWR.

INFORMATION ON PERFORMANCE

CROP ACHIEVED CROPPED AREA ACHIEVED PRODUCTION YIELDS
1. Maize 5,013 3,708 0.73
2. Millet 9,078 4,450 0.49
3. Sorghum 49,523 38,361 0.77
4. Groundnut 8,038 11,775 1.46
5. Cowpea 2,669 1,989 0.74
6. Soybean 168
7. Rice 80 614 1.80

Yield increases of particularly the cereals were as the result of the introduction of the fertilizer subsidies by the Government. However, there were deductions in areas cultivated for some other crops.

Source: MoFA – DADU

TARGETED CROP AREAS OF MAJOR CROPS (2009)

CROP CROPPED AREA

(HA)

PRODUCTION

(MT)

ESTIMATED YIELDS

PER HACTOR

1. Maize 3,600 3,240 0.90
2. Millet 12,700 10,320 1.60
3. Sorghum 54,300 59,730 1.10
4. Groundnut 13,800 20,700 1.50
5. Cowpea 3,400 3,740 1.10
6. Soybean 170 136 0.80
7. Rice 100 180 1.80

Source: MoFA – UWR

INFORMATION ON PERFORMANCE

CROP ACHIEVED CROPPED AREA ACHIEVED PRODUCTION YIELDS
1. Maize 5,263 3,893 0.73
2. Millet 9,078 4,440 0.48
3. Sorghum 50,513 39,511 0.78
4. Groundnut 8,279 12,010 1.45
5. Cowpea 2,749 3,024 1.10
6. Soybean 176 144 0.80
7. Rice 2,784 5,011 1.80

Cropped areas of cereals keep increasing as a result of Governments fertilizer subsidies. Similarly there is a gradual graduation of cultivated areas. Food sufficiency I being ensured

Source: MoFA – DADU

TARGETED CROP AREAS OF MAJOR CROPS (2010)

CROP CROPPED AREA

(HA)

PRODUCTION

(MT)

ESTIMATED YIELDS

PER HACTOR

1. Maize 4,680 4.680 1.00
2. Millet 25,088 17,920 1.40
3. Sorghum 52,563 47,784 1.10
4. Groundnut 38,861 24,288 1.60
5. Cowpea 4,719 4,290 1.10
6. Soybean 166 173 0.96
7. Rice 2,784 5,011 1.80

Source: MoFA – UWR

INFORMATION ON PERFORMANCE

CROP ACHIEVED CROPPED AREA ACHIEVED PRODUCTION YIELDS
1. Maize 5,526 5,526 1.0
2. Millet 9,532 4,816 0.5
3. Sorghum 53,038 39,778 0.75
4. Groundnut 8,693 4,347 0.5
5. Cowpea 2,886 1,443 0.5
6. Soybean 185 139 0.75
7. Rice 2,923 3,508 1.2

As a result of fertilizer subsidies by the Government and the availability of tractors for ploughing, production areas keep increasing. Food security is becoming a reality. Farmers are also able to sell to make money.

Source: MoFA – DADU

LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION

Major Livestock Species and Population

YEAR 2009 YEAR 2010 YEAR 2011
1. Cattle 5,451 5,723 6,009
2. Sheep 8,547 8,974 9,422
3. Goats 20,849 21,891 22,985
4. Pigs 7,522 7,891 8,285
5. Poultry 43,260 45,423 47,694
6. Donkey 213 217 221

Increment of livestock numbers is as a result of no major disease out break since 2009 and improved livestock health care delivery.

The livestock sub-sector continues to make steady but moderate gains as it is now becoming the most lucrative investment in the midst of low income levels emanating from crop production. Goat Sheep and poultry production seem to lead the production levels.

Poultry and goats are still the most commonly reared livestock species in the district. Poultry continues to dominate the attention of the youth and farmers alike since little labour is required for an excellent income.

Pig rearing despite the high labour demand continues to receive a boost since it is fast becoming the most affordable meat within the district. The presence of CSIR funded pig feed formulation meal in the district has further boosted the potentials of pig rearing in the district. It has become a strong source of security in terms of income especially for the vulnerable and excluded in the society,(the aged and widows.).

Pig rearing is further boosted by the presence of Babile Agric Research centre that specializes on research in pig rearing.

The Lawra District has a huge comparative advantage in the area of goat and sheep rearing. It has over the years established itself as the marketing centre for goats and sheep. The Babile market every week receives buyers from Wa (the Regional Capital), Ashanti and the Brong Ahafo Regions. These businessmen besiege the Babile market every week to buy hundreds of sheep and goats to transport to the south.

However, over half of the goats and sheep sold at the Babile market are imports from neighboring Republic of Burkina Faso. The District has the potential to develop fully the livestock sub-sector.

Majority of the farmers are still using the local breeds which needs up grading with improved breeds.

The DADU carries out activities such as annual vaccinations against major diseases such as, CBPP and Anthrax on cattle, PPR on small ruminants, New castle disease on poultry, Routine treatment of animal diseases Deworming, detrcking etc.

Upgrading of local fowls is a priority for the District.

Housing for livestock is very poor and needs improvement in this sector. Farmers are therefore being educated on the need to house farm animals.

Livestock census is on going.

FISH PRODUCTION

There are no fish ponds or farms in the District. However, individual fishermen fish in the Black Volta River particularly during the dry season using cast nets and hooks with the aid of fishing canoes. I n communities where there are dams and dugouts, such water bodies are stuck with fingerlings by Regional Fisheries departments. When such fishes reach maturity communities invite the Fisheries department to harvest the fish.

SUMMARY OF FIELD DEMONSTRATION

CROP ACREAGE AMOUNT GH¢ YEAR
Released Recovered
1. Cowpea 18 1800 203.42 2008
2. Maize 27 2700 1,854.8
Total 45 4,500 2,058.22
1. Maize 17 1800 407.00 2009
2. Cowpea 1 100 0.00
3. Groundnut 11 1,100 350.00
Total 29 3,000 757.00

In the year 2008, 18 acres of demonstrations were established as income generating actives to 18 groups using 18 core farmers while 27 acres of demonstrations on food security were established. Farmers were able to pay back about half of the rate to be recovered.

In the ensuing year, the demonstrations were reduced as many of the AEAs were supervising the Block Farms. In 2009 demonstrations 5 AEAs were selected to carry out 5 demonstrations, (3 each on maize food security and two each on income generation) . Due to the floods and later latter the drought, yields were very poor and therefore recovery very low. However, in 2008 demonstrations 11 AEAs carried out the demonstrations, yield were better and therefore recovery was quite high.

REPORT ON WEATHER FORECAST GROUNDNUT DEMONSTRATION

CROP ACREAGE YIELDS/PLOT
None fertilizer fertilizer
Groundnut 3 207 kg 302 kg

This was to compare the use of fertilizer verses no use of fertilizers on some timely bases with special emphasis on the weather. Though inputs were late, it still proved that the fertilizer application yielded higher.

FERTILIZER SUBSIDY PROGRAMME

FERTILIZER SUBSIDY FOR 2008

Type Of Fertilizer Booklets

Received

Booklets

Used

Balance

Returned

Remarks
NPK 15:15:15 69 69 0 3,450
NPK 23:10:05 25 25 0 1,250
S/A 56 52 4 2,600
Urea 9 9 0 450

A total of 3,450 bags of NPK (15:15:15) compound fertilizers; 1,250 bags of NPK (23:10:05) compound fertilizers were subsidized for farmers in the 2008 production year.

A total of 2,600bags of Sulphate of Ammonia and 450 bags of UREA fertilizers were equally subsidized to farmers in the District. These subsidies helped to increase production and productivity. It also ensured food security in the district as well as enriching farmers. Processors and marketers were also invariably employed by the syste

FERTILIZER SUBSIDY FOR 2009

TYPE OF FERTILIZER BOOKLETS

RECEIVED

BOOKLETS

USED

BALANCE

RETURNED

Remarks
NPK 15:15:15 88 88 3 not completed 4,250
NPK 23:10:05 33 31 2 1,450
S/A 81 79 2 3,850
Urea 18 15 3 600

In the following year, 2009, more fertilizers were subsidized in the District. From the above table, subsidy on NPK 15:15:15 I increased from 3,450 bags to 4,250 bags: NPK 23:10:05 from 1,250 bags to 1,450 bags: S/A from 2,600 bags to 3, 850 bags and Urea from 450 bags to 600 bags. The above subsidies called for the increases in food crop production in the district within the ensuing years.

FERTILIZER SUBSIDY FOR 2010

TYPE OF FERTILIZER QUANTITY Remarks
NPK 15:15:15 4,837 11,632 bags of assorted fertilizers were subsidized by Government to farmers in the district.
NPK 23:10:05 1,623
S/A 3,212
Urea 528
NPK 16:16:16 702
Sulfan 730
Total : 11,632

The subsidy system continued while the coupon system dropped. The subsidy in 2010 was instituted through the fertilizer agents system. Nine fertilizer agents sold Governments subsidized fertilizers to farmers in the district in 2010

As a result of the fertilizer subsidy, production of the main cereal crops such as maize, sorghum and rice have increased. This reduced poverty levels of farmers and increased food security in the district. Acreages have also increased.

SPECIAL PROJECTS

1. BLOCK FARMS

YEAR CROP NO. OF FARMERS ACREAGE
MALES FEMALES
2009 MAIZE

RICE

82

63

24

16

122.5

106

TOTALS 145 40 228.5
2010 MAIZE

RICE

SORGHUM

198

49

1

28

1

10

211.5

50

11

TOTALS 248 39 272.5

In the year 2009, 145 male farmers and 40 female farmers took part in the block farm concept. A total of 122.5 acres of maize and 106 acres rice were cultivated. The weather so much affected the yields. First were the floods and then the rains stopped early. However, some gains were made.

In the ensuing year (2010) 248 male and 39 female beneficiaries cultivated a total of 272.5 acres of maize, sorghum and rice. The beginning of the year was problematic again. The rains delayed in coming, tractor services were not easily available and the main compound fertilizers used, 16:16:16 was ineffective. This resulted in poor yields and subsequently low recovery.

The block farm concept is non the less very good and is being continued

2. LAND AND WATER MANAGEMENT

Activities were undertaken in two communities: Kusele and Tongoh.A total of 150 beneficiary farmers comprising 62 women and 88 men from both communities. Farmers were taken through Farmer Field School processes to address land management issues especially for crop production and environmental protection. The physical environment in these two communities is more protected than many others although they are faced with a lot of challenges.

3. VILLAGE MANGO PROJECT

The project has been established in 2 communities Guo and Nandom Tanchara and graduated to include two other communities, Eremon Naburnye and Brifoh. The farmers in these communities were given grafted mango seedlings totaling over 12,000 seedlings. The ultimate aim is for the fruit trees to serve as income generating as well as for environmental protection

NEW INNITIATIVES

MUCUNA

Two trials of Mucuna were established in 2 communities, Lawra Kuolipuor and Nandom Tanchara with the objective of controlling strrga and improving soil fertility. 50 core farmers are being used. However more than 100 other farmers have been observing the activities. Some participating farmers (females) and AEAs were later trained on Mucuna processing and utilization.

AGRA

Alliance for Green Revolusution in Africa Demonstration trials were established in 2 communities in 2010. The aim is to train fifty (50) nuclear farmers through the Farmer Field School concept on soil health.

PROMOTION OF MILLET AND SORGHUM (PROMISO 2)

Two communities have been earmarked to establish sorghum and millet demonstrations. Since the District has the potential to produce millet and sorghum, the system is to understudy methods of increasing the productivity of these two crops.

VOLTA BASIN 2 (V²)

It is an initiative to establish livestock and cowpea ecosystem by household in 2 communities with emphasis on women household using designed appropriate rain water harvesting methods in the field.

INFORMATION ON STRENTHS AND WEAKNESSES

Strengths

The presence of the District Assembly and her readiness to support MoFA is an indication of strength. The District Assembly has indeed supported MoFA in diverse ways: to support the running of programmes, maintenance of official vehicle, organize farmers day celebrations.

Nandom Agric Project a local non governmental organization located in Nandom collaborates excellently with MoFA in all aspects of agriculture in reaching farmers with appropriate technologies.

The Black Volta River that borders the district at the west with Burkina Faso is an all year round water source for the district. This could be harnessed to the hinterland and developed for all year round crop production.

The Babile Agric station has a total land area of 256 hectares. Currently it is only the Pig breeding station that is functioning effectively. The Agric mechanization centre and the Crop research centers could be reactivated. The station has the potential to breed and supply improved guinea fouls to farmers.

The district has the potential for livestock and poultry production. Babile market is one of the largest poultry, sheep and goats market in the Upper West region.

ACHIEVEMENTS 2008-2010

  • Through crop demonstrations and the Block Farm concept, over 900 farmers of which about 30% were female farmers benefited from the programmes through technological packages that improved yields.
  • Facilitated support to cover over 330 vulnerable farmers to produce 67.2 Ha of rice through Catholic Relief Services and MoFA collaboration.
  • Provided inputs and technical support to Orbilli, Nandom-Tanchara and Eremon Zinpien livestock farmers through Animal Research AND MoFA collaboration.
  • Facilitated and supported selected farmers in Tome Kukoduo, Zaakpe and Puffien in Integrated crop production through JICA MoFA collaboration
  • Through FAO Technical Cooperation support, Kusele and Tongoh communities have implemented land and water activities to address low soil fertility and land degradation problems.
  • Through FAO support, 22 water pumping machines have been distributed to 22 vegetable producer groups along the Black Volta river with the aim of mitigating the 2007 flood disaster. These groups were also given the technical support to continue to use the facility
  • Over 300 poultry farmers received improved guinea foul keets from Belgium through the initiative of International Centre for Sustainable Enterprise Development (ICED) with MoFA collaborative support. The link between ICED, MoFA and the District Assembly is still in place.
  • Through the collaboration of MoFA, Nandom Agric Project and CARE GHANA, over 325 farmers benefited from Conservation Agricultural training using the Farmer Field School concept to address soil fertility and land degradation.
  • Through the Northern Rural Growth programme, 15 15 farmer groups were supported to cultivate and produce 27.6 Ha of maize, 32, 4 Ha of sorghum and 20 Ha of soybeans. A total of 197 farmers were involved (161 males and 36 females).
  • Four communities: Nandom Tanchara, Guo, Eremon Naburnye and Brifoh were supported with over 12,000 improved mango seedlings to serve as income generating activities as well as for environmental protection.

LOCATION OF OTHER OFFICE BRANCHES

Locations of the zones of the District and operational areas

Sr. Zones No. of operational areas (O.A.)
1 Lawra 7
2 Nandom 6
3 Eremon 7

Operational Areas and their Headquarters

Sr. Lawra zone Eremon zone Nandom zone
1 O.A. Headquarters O.A. Headquarters O.A. Headquarters
2 Lawra Lawra Zambo Zambo Gengenkpe Gengenkpe
3 Tabier Tabier Eremon Eremon Munyupele Munyupele
4 Kalsagri Kalsagri Dowmini Dowmini Nandom Nandom
5 Tolibri Tolibri Lyssah Lyssah Betaglu Betaglu
6 Tampier Tampier Ko Ko Tantuo Tantuo
7 Babile Babile Tome Tome Kokoligu Kokoligu
8 Brifoh Brifoh Brutu Brutu