Wa East

    INTRODUCTION

Location and Size

The Wa East district was curved out of the former Wa District and made a district by L.I 1746 in July 2004. The district is located in the south eastern part of the Upper West region. Funsi, the district capital is about 115km away from Wa which is the regional capital. The district shares boundaries with West Mamprusi to the northwest, West Gonja to southeast and the Sissala East district to the north. It has a landmass of about 3,196.4km², which is located between latitudes 9º 55′ and 10º 25’n and longitude 1º 10’w and 2º 5’w. The district occupies 17.3% of the total landmass of the region (18,478.4Km2). The remoteness of the district relative to other districts of the region has deprived it of basic social and economic infrastructure and services.

Topography and Drainage

The land is generally undulating with height between 180-1300m above sea level. Drainage in the district is the dendrite type, dominated by the Kulpawn River and its tributaries. Most of the rivers over flow their banks during the rainy seasons and render most parts of the district inaccessible during this period. However, they dry up during the dry season. These rivers provide vast potentials for the construction of irrigation dams for dry season farming.

Geology and Soil

The district consists mainly of igneous and metamorphic rocks and they are noted for deposits of gold, iron and bauxite. Illegal Small scale mining activities are therefore taking place in communities such as Bulenga, Duu, Johnfia and Donyukura. The rocks also offer opportunities for a vibrant quarrying industry and their artistic nature present attraction for tourists.

The soils are mainly sandy loamy which are very fertile and suitable for the cultivation of tubers, cereals, legumes etc. Some soils have low inherent fertility with poor physical characteristics due to continuous cropping leading to low yields in such areas

Climate

The climate is tropical equatorial, which prevails throughout the northern part of Ghana. Temperatures are high all-year, reaching its peak in March/April during which there could be an outbreak of Ceribo Spinal Meningitis. During this period temperatures could reach as high as 42cº. The temperatures are lowest in December/January, with temperatures about 22cº. The Harmattan, characterized by cold, dry dusty wind with occasional haze occurs between Novembers to April.

The district has a single rainfall regime, May-October. The average annual rainfall is about 1,200mm/year and they are torrential, erratic and stormy. The torrential and stormy nature of the rainfall annually comes with the destruction of buildings and farmlands. The single rainfall regime does not make farming all year round possible. Most farmers therefore become redundant during the long dry season, from November to May. There is therefore the need for irrigation facilities in the district to provide employment opportunities during this period.

Vegetation

The vegetation is made up of scattered trees, shrubs and grasses of varying heights. The common trees in the district include shea, baobab, kapok, dawadawa, acacia, neem, ebony, mangoes, cashew and acheaple. Annual bush burning, inappropriate farming practices, indiscriminate cutting of trees for wood, charcoal and poor animal husbandry practices have destroyed 30 percent of the natural vegetation. The district is also blessed with the Ambalaara forest reserve, which has various species of animals namely antelopes, baboons, monkeys and lions. The grassy nature of the vegetation which is excellent for grazing annually attracts large numbers of alien Fulani herdsmen into the district. The influx of these Fulani herds of cattle has a very negative and devastative effect on the environment. Fields are left bare due to due over grazing. Also food crops both in storage and on farm are some times destroyed by the cattle.

Water Supply

Table 1: Status of potable water facilities in the Wa East district

Facilities
Boreholes HDW with pump Small Water system Dams/dugouts
92 12 1 14

Demographic Characteristics

Sex and Age Distribution

The district’s has a low sex ratio of 100 males to 103 females. The population of the district is youthful comprising 47% (between 0-14 years), 49% between 15-60 years and 4% over 60 years old. The district therefore has a high dependency ratio.

Migration

The soil fertility in the district has attracted migrant farmers and Fulani herdsmen from the nearby districts of Nadowli and Jirapa/Lambussie into the district. This has served to expand crop and livestock production. However, the destruction of farmlands by Fulani herdsmen and the environmental degradation which result from their activities often bring them into conflict with the local people. There is also a migration of people out of the district especially in the dry season. The youth who formed the majority of the lobour force moved down south to search for miniature jobs.

INVESTMENTS IN AGRICULTURE

Potential investment opportunities exist in agriculture in the district. These include the following;

  • Lowland /valley bottoms for expanded irrigation and rice production.
  • Suitable land for tree crops cultivation (mango and cashew).
  • Vast land for cash crops cultivation (cotton, soya beans, industrial maize).
  • Water bodies for culture fish production (aquaculture).
  • Large wild shea nuts picking and processing (women).

Investments in the agricultural sector are still very low as compared to the potentials mention above. A lot needs to be done to ensure the full exploitation of these potentials.

2. MAJOR CROPS PRODUCED

The major crops produced in the District and the production levels are included in table one below for 2008 – 2010

Table 1 Production levels of major crops

CROP ACHIEVABLE MT/HA ACTUAL (MT/HA) ACTUAL LAND AREA ACTUAL PRODUCTION (MT)
2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010 2008 2009 2010
Maize 2.5 1.4 1.6 1.8 5,295 6,300 7,500 7,479 10,390 11,296
Sorghum 1.5 1.0 0.9 0.98 3,310 4,100 5,080 3,383 3,690 4,033
Millet 1.3 0.6 0.7 0.7 6,025 6,400 6,800 3,434 4,160 4,583
Rice 3.5 1.5 1.8 2.3 482 600 750 735 1,080 1,360
Groundnut 1.0 1.0 1.4 1.6 11,792 11,900 12,010 11,792 19,040 19,080
Cowpea 1.3 0.9 0.9 0.93 4262 4,900 4,410 3,836 4,410 4,557
Soya bean 1.5 4,115 4,300 4,490 390.9 6,020 6,390
Yam 20.0 11.5 11.8 21.4 5,359 3,700 5,180 27,176 44,000 47,000
Cassava 28.0

3. LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION

There is a high potential for livestock and poultry production in the district. It is the second most important agricultural activity under taken by farmers for income generation and home consumption.

The major livestock and poultry kept by farmers include cattle, sheep goats, swine, rural poultry, guinea fowls turkeys, ducks and pigeons.

Farmers greatly supplement their incomes from livestock and poultry.

Table: Production of Livestock and Poultry

Species 2008 2009 2010
Cattle 37,000 39,000 40,700
Sheep 29,500 31,600 32,700
Goats 34,400 34,700 35,900
Swine 5,200 5,900 6,050
Rural poultry 100,000 110,000 112,000

FERTILIZER SUBSIDY

Data on fertilizer subsidy programme are indicated in table below

Table: Fertilizer Subsidy

FERTILIZER TYPE QUANTITY SUBSIDISED IN 50KG BAGS REMARKS
2008 2009 2010
NPK 15:15:15 3,596 4900 Nil Farmers purchased direct from distributors in Wa.
NPK 23:10:05 1750 2350 Nil
S/A 3015 4963 Nil
UREA Nil 988 Nil

SPECIAL PROJECTS

There are about thirteen (13) special projects being implemented in the district through donor support and NGOs. Details of such projects are indicated in the table below.

Table 6: Special Project

NAME/TYPE OF PROJECT SPONSORS INTERVENTIONS AREAS AMOUNT INVOLVED YEAR STARTED YEAR END
Livestock Development Project (LDP) AfDB/GOG
  • Capacity building
  • Vaccinations
  • Credit in cash/kind
  • Water source construction.
  • Fodder banks
2005 2010
Root and Tuber Improvement and Marketing Programme (RTIMP) IFAD

GOG

  • Establishment of secondary production multiplication farms.
  • Establishment of tertiary fields
2008 2016
Northern Rural Growth Programme

(NRGP)

IFAD/AfDB

GOG

  • Improving agricultural production through commodity value chain development.
2009
Rice Sector Support Project (RSSP) French Dev’t Agency
  • Development of lowlands for expanded rice production
2010 2015
N2 Africa Project.

SARI/MOFA Collaboration

Bill Gate Foundation
  • Enhancing increased legumes production through dissemination of best production packages on (cowpea, soya bean and groundnuts)
2010 2012
AGRA Soil Health Project (AGRA SHP) Alliance for Green Revolution in Africa
  • Soil fertility improvement for cereal based production systems and evaluation of maize varieties for drought tolerant and hybrid maize production.
2010 2011
Plan Ghana-EU Food Facility Project. European commission Plan Ireland
  • Expanded crops production maize/soya bean in 10,000 hhs in 100 communities.
  • Inventory credit scheme.
  • Operation of village savings and loans Associations
2010 2011
ADRA-EC

Northern Ghana Food Security Resilience \project. (NGFCRP)

EUROPEAN Commission (EC)

ADRA

UK

  • Expanded maize production and capacity building of farmers in 1,500 hhs
2010 2011
Concern Universal/UNDP Food Security Facility Project EC/UNDP
  • Expanded maize production in 200 households in 5 communities.
  • Supply hermetic storage poly sacks to farmers
  • Supply of 2 maize shellers to 2 communities (Kunyebin and Yaala II)
2010 2011
Africa 2000 Net Works/UNDP Programme UNDP
  • Support to three groups with agro-processing machines and buildings.
  • Support to groups with animal traction equipment and bullock.
  • Support to 4 communities with certified seeds and fencing wires for crops production.
  • Support to groups with small ruminant/poultry/guinea fowl for raring
2008 2011
Plan Ghana Animal Projection Project
  • Support to 9 women groups in animals production and animal traction
2007 2010
Special Rice Initiation Project (MOFA/SARI/DDO Collaboration) CRS
  • Support for the vulnerable in rice production.
2009 201
PROMISO 2 PROJECT.

Promoting millet and sorghum production. (MOFA/SARI Collaboration)

European Commission (EC)
  • Improved sorghum and millet production in 2 communities (Bulenga and Loggu)
2011 2011

SPECIAL PROGRAMMES

Table: Special Programme

NAME/TYPE OF PROGRAMMES INTERVENTIONS AREAS FUNDING SOURCE YEAR STARTED YEAR END
Youth In Agric. Production (Block Farms)
  • Support for expanded maize, rice, soybean and sorghum production.
GOG 2008 Up to date 2010
Fertilizer subsidy/ coupons programme
  • Support to farmers for increased production by way of subsidy on fertilizers
GoG 2008 Up to date
Farmer registration exercise
  • Compilation of data on all farmers in district.
GOG 2010 2011
TUDRIDEP/NGO
  • Support for crops production and marketing of produce.
  • Support to farmers with sheep/goats breeding stocks.
2007 2011
FAO Support to 2007/2008 Flood Victims production
  • Supply of 35 water pumping machines and 364 to PVC pipes to 2 groups for dry season farming at dam sites streams.
  • Supply of vegetable seeds fertilizers and cowpea seeds and agro chemicals for crops production.
FAO 2007 2010
PRONET GHANA Support for Vegetables production.
  • Support to 3 communities with garden nursery materials seeds etc. for vegetable production (Loggu, Bulenga, Manwe)
UNDP/African 2000 NW 2007 2009

ACHIEVEMENTS 2008-2010

Key DADU achievements over the years in the agricultural sector are;

    Crop production

Expanded crops technologies adoption by farmers who participated in the various crops production packages. An average of about 60% adoption by farmers who were reached out with extension messages through demonstrations and other projects interventions was achieved. The table bellow indicates summaries of achievements.

Table 8: Achievement

ACTIVITY INDICATORS INDICATORS LEVELS OF ACHIEVEMENTS OR OUTPUTS (MT)
2008 2009 2010
Percentage increase in yields of major crops in;

Maize

Sorghum

Millet

Rice

Groundnuts

Cowpea

Soya beans

Yams

7,479

3,383

3,434

735

11,792

3,836

3,909

27,176

10,395MT

3,690MT

4,160MT

1,080MT

19,040MT

4,410MT

6,020MT

44,000MT

11,296MT (9%)

4,013MT (8.8%)

4,583MT (7.7%)

1,360MT (27.8%)

19,080MT (0%)

4,557.5MT (3%)

6,390MT (7%)

47,000MT (7%)

Percentage increase in number of livestock;

Cattle

Sheep

Goats

Pigs

Rural poultry

37,000

29,500

34,400

5,200

100,00

39,000

31,600

34,700

3,900

110,000

40,700 (4.40%)

32,700 (3.50%)

35,900 (3.70%)

6,050 (2.50%)

112,000 (1.80%)

Extension services delivery;

Numbers of farmers reached with improved technologies

9176 farmers

5573 males

3603 females

5,253 farmers

3,691 males

1,562 females

14,702 farmers

8,679 males

6,023 females

Number of farmers reached with livestock technologies 3479 farmers

2091 males

1388 females

661 farmers

532 males

129 females

2821 farmers

1782 males

1039 females

Numbers of on-farm demos conducted with farmers 50 acres of on farm demonstrations plots with 50 farmers. Maize /cowpea. 54 demos plots of one acre each of maize and livestock (pigs /poultry) 19 demos on maize, cowpea, groundnuts, soya beans established
Numbers of farmers reached out with food processing and nutrition education (WIAD) 746 farmers

193 males

553 females

632 farmers

143 males

489 females

1,820 farmers

(male=463, female=1,357)

Number of field days conducted on demonstrations 150 field days

(1048 participated)

537 males

511 females

100 field days

789 farmers

409 males

380 females

16 fields days

480 participants (male=160, female=320)

Conduct farmers registration in communities 0 0 5,832 farmers

5,006 males

826 females

Support to farmers for dry season vegetables production (FAO) 10 water pumps and accessories supplied to 7 farmers groups (FAO)

(Seeds, fertilizers and chemicals supplied)

23 water pumps supplied to 20 farmer groups (FAO) (Seeds, fertilizers and chemicals supplied ) 2 water pumps supplied to one women group. Kpaliwurgu (FAO)
Rehabilitation and construction of small dams and dugouts /boreholes 0 Four dams /dugouts rehabilitated at Manwe Loggu, Kundugu and Goripie GTZ /GIDA One dugout constructed at Tisa (LPD)

One borehole drilled at Baayiri (LPD)

Establishment of block farms

(Gain + Seed)

39.2ha sorghum-kapaala cultivated by 7 groups (recovery 27.61%) 177.6ha of maize,

Recovery 797.5 bags (52.66%)

Rice cultivated by 5 farmers.

434.4ha cultivated 1,232 bags recovery out of 2,975bags (41.41%)
Supply of fertilizer coupons to farmer subsidy programme 15-15-15

3596 bags

23-00-05

1750 bags

Sulphate of ammonia

3015 bags

15-15-15

4900 bags

23-00-05

2350 bags

Sulphate of ammonia

4963 bags

Urea-988 bags

Not available

Farmers made direct purchase from distributers

Supply of inputs for expanded crops production under European Commission food security projects with plan Ghana, ADRA, concern universal Plan Ghana supported with 20,000 bags of 23-10-05 and 10,000 bags of urea for maize and soya beans production (20,000 acres) (8,000 ha)

ADRA supported with 2,508 bags of NPK and 1,254 bags of sulphate of ammonia for cultivating 2254 acres of maize (901.6 ha)

Concern universal supported with 400 bags of NPK and 260 bags of S /A for cultivation of 200 acres of maize (80ha).

Maize and soya beans production increased in the district in 2010

Establishment of improved cassava planting materials under (RTIMP) 3.1 acres (1.24 ha) secondary multiplication plots planted by 3 farmers. Nil 5.0 acres (2ha.) secondary multiplication farms planted by 5 farmers
Establishment of tertiary farms Tertiary fields planted by 374 farmers. 65.25 acres (20.1ha) tertiary fields planted by 261 farmers.
Support to women groups with agro processing machines

(Africa 2 NW /UNDP)

Three machines supplied to three groups (Loggu, Bulenga, Manwe)
Support to farmers for bullock ploughing

(plan Ghana)

30 bulls supplied to 3 women groups in Chaggu, Tineabe , Holomuni. 10 bulls supplied to one women group at Sombisi
Number of livestock vaccinated against major diseases. 15,225 animals vaccinated.

GH 1,059.50 generated

9,426 animals vaccinated.

GH 3,026.91 generated

13,801 animals vaccinated.

GH 4,175.50 generated

Number of fodder banks established for small ruminants feeding 6 acres fodder banks of cajanus 6 acres fodder banks of cajanus 8 acres fodder banks of cajanus.
Number of farmers awarded at district national farmers days celebrations. 20 award winners honored 27 winners honored 25 winners honored
Number of farmers educated on the effects of HIV /AID’S, malaria and guinea worm preventions on control management 2,640 farmers

1,145 males

1,495 females

4693 farmers

(2718 males)

(1975 females)

4197 farmers

(1880 males)

(2317 females)

LOCATION OF SOME OTHER OFFICE BRANCHES;

The district capital is Funsi with four zonal centers namely; Funsi, Bulenga, Kulkpong, and Baayiri. There are seventeen operational areas namely; Funsi, Buffimah, Kundugu, Baayiri, Gudaayiri, Kpalinye, Jankore, Bulenga, Katua, Ducie, Manwe, Kulkpong, Loggu, Tanina, Goh, Yaala and Chasia.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.